Seyfarth Synopsis: Marijuana businesses must properly label their products if they contain chemicals that can cause cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive health problems.  Failure to do so will result in a civil penalty or civil lawsuit.

Entrepreneurial Plaintiff’s attorneys have now set their sites on marijuana businesses.  Since January 1, 2017, Plaintiff’s firms have issued approximately 800 violation notice letters to marijuana businesses alleging that producers of cannabis infused edibles and vape cartridge manufacturers failed to warn consumers about specific fungicides and pesticides associated with their products.

California’s Proposition 65, or the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, requires cannabis business owners to provide customers with warning of the chemicals contained in their products which can cause cancer, birth defects, and other health problems.  Among the substances “known to the state of California” to cause cancer, birth defects and other health problems are marijuana smoke itself, and the chemicals myclobutanil (also a fungicide), carbaryl, and malathion, commonly-used pesticides. Continue Reading Beware: Marijuana Businesses Targeted With Product Labeling Violation Letters

On June 15, 2017, California’s Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board adopted the advisory committee recommendation that there is no current need for industry-specific regulations related to the activities of facilities licensed under the Medical Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act. But while the decision is good news for the industry, the findings leading to the recommendation reveal that the medical marijuana industry as a whole lacks a basic understanding of the rules that govern it and its obligations under them. Continue Reading Cal/OSHA Determines No Special Rules Needed for Medical Marijuana Industry

Recently, the San Francisco Chronicle published an interesting story examining two fronts on which labor unions are trying to cash in on the passage of Prop 64 in November 2016, which legalized the sale and personal use of recreational marijuana in California. With its passing, California is poised to become the largest, most lucrative market for marijuana products in the United States (assuming the successes of craft beer and fine wines are fair markers). Nearly six months later, the industry is in its infancy with much to be decided on cannabis’ regulation. Continue Reading Unions Find The Grass On The Other Side of Prop 64 Particularly Green

Seyfarth Synopsis: California lawmakers are struggling to implement the regulations necessary to govern the sale of recreational marijuana, which is causing much uncertainty among businesses and local governments.

California voters passed the Adult Use Marijuana Act (“AUMA”) in November, but State officials are still struggling to figure out exactly how they will regulate the sale of marijuana for recreational use. Continue Reading Lack Of California Regulations Sparks Continued Uncertainty For Sale Of Recreational Marijuana

Golden State voters trail-blazed the way for the legalized use and sale of marijuana on November 8, 2016. The California Marijuana Legalization Initiative, known as Proposition 64, was welcomed with open arms (and maybe a little cotton mouth) by the nation’s largest economy with a vote of 56% in favor of the law. Continue Reading California High on Proposition 64’s Recreational Marijuana Law

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at the world of legalized marijuana.

Nebraska and Oklahoma may not have had their day in (Supreme) Court, but they are undeterred in their fight against Colorado’s legalization of recreational marijuana.

A judge in Illinois’ Cook County ordered the state’s medical marijuana program to add post-traumatic stress disorder to the list of qualifying conditions for MMJ within 30 days.

An initiative has officially obtained enough signatures to be placed on November’s ballot. It would allow adults to possess up to an ounce of marijuana and grow up to six plants for recreational use.

Authorities say they have arrested a man on suspicion of driving while high on pot after he crashed into a Happy Valley marijuana dispensary.

That last item was more for fun than real news value, but it’s Friday, it’s a long weekend, and how could we resist?

Anything we missed?  Let us know in the comments.

Hello all and welcome back to The Week in Weed, your go-to source for news in the world of legalized marijuana.

This new ordinance is a bit of a head-scratcher.  “A marijuana conviction often can disqualify you from receiving a cannabis business license, but in Oakland it can give you an advantage over applicants with clean records.”  Under this legislation, half of all licenses to run medical marijuana businesses must go to persons with convictions for cannabis-related offenses or who live in one of six neighborhoods targeted by the Oakland Police Department’s war on drugs.  The stated purpose is to increase diversity in the marijuana industry, but critics of the bill note that “most of the six police beats included in the bill lie in the city council district of the councilor who sponsored the legislation.”

 

The Southeast is an area of the country where legalized marijuana has not made much of an inroad.  This may be about to change as Louisiana takes another step towards legalizing the use of cannabis for medical purposes.  The personal stories of those urging passage of the measure are believed to have swayed legislators over the arguments of opponents that legalizing medical marijuana is a step on the slippery slope to legalizing for recreational use.

 

Are you ready for some (medical marijuana in) football?  Eugene Morris, who plays for the Baltimore Ravens, is advocating the use of cannabis in lieu of opioids to treat pain resulting from the rough and tumble inherent in the sport.

 

Anything we missed?  Let us know in the comments section.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your source for articles on legalized marijuana.  Supporters of full legalization had a “one step forward; one step back” week.  It looks like a ballot measure legalizing recreational marijuana will qualify for the November ballot in California, but in Vermont, legislation that would have legalized cannabis was defeated.  You win some; you lose some.  Also, in Hawaii, nurse practitioners would be allowed to certify patients to use medical marijuana, what the article calls medi-juana.  We’ve not heard that term before, but we like it very much.

 

Supporters of a recreational marijuana ballot measure in California handed in more than 600,000 signatures, indicating the initiative is virtually assured of going before voters in November, local media reported. Supporters amassed a comfortable…

 

State lawmakers have tweaked a medical marijuana bill to allow advanced practice registered nurses to certify patients to use medical marijuana. Previously, only physicians were allowed to qualify patients for the drug, which has been legal for…

 

As reported in this local NPR article, headlined “House Snuffs Marijuana Legalization, Issue Dead For 2016 Session,” the only state legislature that seemed to be seriously consider legalizing recreational marijuana via traditional…

 

Something important we missed?  Let us know in the comments.

With Pennsylvania joining in last month, nearly half the country has laws permitting state residents to use marijuana for medical purposes, and a handful even permit recreational use. California led the movement when it passed the so-called “Compassionate Use Act” in 1996. At present, use and distribution of marijuana remain federal offenses, although unenforced per current U.S. Department of Justice policy.

The increasing accessibility of marijuana over the years, as well as its acceptance into mainstream culture, have led to serious misconceptions regarding its permissibility in the workplace. We offer here a few reminders to help clear up this this sometimes “hazy” area of California law. Continue Reading A “Hotbox” Of Legal Issues: California’s Workplace Marijuana Laws

Can stand-alone retail establishments weed out petitioners seeking to gather signatures to legalize marijuana on their private property? Yes, they can(nabis)! California courts have granted injunctions against individuals gathering signatures for ballot measures on private property. Continue Reading 4/20 Getting in your Way? How to Weed Out the Petitioners at your Retail Establishment