Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Starting off in the international sphere, the European Parliament has passed a resolution recommending the descheduling of cannabis.  The hope is that this could lead to the establishment of bloc-wide medical marijuana laws.

In South Korea, medical marijuana will be legalized in March.

Among the states moving towards legalization of cannabis or medical cannabis are: Kentucky, Georgia, North Carolina, Wisconsin and Vermont (which currently has a “DC-style” system: you can grow it and you can use it, but you can’t buy it or sell it).

New Jersey’s move to legalize had been held up by tax considerations.  Now that those have been worked out, look for a bill to be introduced in the legislature in the near future.

The New Mexico Senate has approved a bill allowing the use of medical marijuana in schools.  The legislation now moves to the House.

Lawmakers from Maryland have formed a bipartisan group to study legalizing recreational cannabis in 2020.  The state currently allows the use of medical marijuana, which has generated $100 million in sales in its first year.

And speaking of sales, Pennsylvania’s medical cannabis program brought in $132 million in its first year.

One of the difficulties facing cannabis businesses  is the lack of access to financial services.  Alaska’s Credit Union 1 seeks to change that next month.

The United Parcel Service is less than happy over the logo used by United Pot Smokers.  The first UPS is suing the second UPS in federal court for trademark infringement.  If High Times suggests it’s time to drop the “sassy parody brands,” it probably is…

Finally, from the “I Could Have Told You That” files, researches have discovered a correlation between recreational marijuana laws and junk food sales.

Welcome to our end of the year wrap-up post for The Week in Weed; it’s hard to believe another year has come and (almost) gone, but the calendar doesn’t lie.  In what we are calling an homage to Dave Barry and his always hilarious Year in Review, we’ll organize these stories by month.

Without further ado, here’s a look at the stories that grabbed our attention in 2018. Continue Reading The Week, No Make that the Year, in Weed: 2018

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Although tracking politicians’ changing views on marijuana has become something of a regular feature here on The Week in Weed, one public official who is unlikely to change his stance is Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

The Attorney General remains steadfast in his dedication to cracking down on cannabis.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ decision in January to rescind the Cole Memo hasn’t had a big impact on the U.S. cannabis industry, but it could.

Meanwhile, across the pond, the United Kingdom has legalized medical marijuana.

British doctors will be able to prescribe marijuana plant-derived medicine to patients beginning this fall, British Home Secretary Sajid Javid said Thursday.

And the Republic of Georgia legalizes cannabis consumption.

The nation of Georgia officially legalized the consumption of cannabis this week in a Constitutional Court ruling, according to an RFE/RL report. The ruling, however, does not legalize the sale or cultivation of the plant.

 

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Legal marijuana is certain to appeal to the 9 million annual visitors but industrial hemp also could boost self-reliance in the Aloha State.

Colorado’s largest city is reviewing the first application from a business seeking to be among the nation’s first legal marijuana clubs, a step that comes more than a year after voters approved a bring-your-own pot measure.

On November 30, 2017, the Constitutional Court of Georgia decriminalized the personal use of marijuana and other cannabis-based products.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.