Welcome to our end of the year wrap-up post for The Week in Weed; it’s hard to believe another year has come and (almost) gone, but the calendar doesn’t lie.  In what we are calling an homage to Dave Barry and his always hilarious Year in Review, we’ll organize these stories by month.

Without further ado, here’s a look at the stories that grabbed our attention in 2018. Continue Reading The Week, No Make that the Year, in Weed: 2018

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Although tracking politicians’ changing views on marijuana has become something of a regular feature here on The Week in Weed, one public official who is unlikely to change his stance is Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

The Attorney General remains steadfast in his dedication to cracking down on cannabis.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ decision in January to rescind the Cole Memo hasn’t had a big impact on the U.S. cannabis industry, but it could.

Meanwhile, across the pond, the United Kingdom has legalized medical marijuana.

British doctors will be able to prescribe marijuana plant-derived medicine to patients beginning this fall, British Home Secretary Sajid Javid said Thursday.

And the Republic of Georgia legalizes cannabis consumption.

The nation of Georgia officially legalized the consumption of cannabis this week in a Constitutional Court ruling, according to an RFE/RL report. The ruling, however, does not legalize the sale or cultivation of the plant.

 

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

California, Oregon and other marijuana-friendly states are seeking a meeting with U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in hopes of resolving the conflict between federal and state laws that has left the nation’s cannabis industry in legal limbo.

The chief executive of one of Canada’s largest banks said it would weigh financing cannabis companies after legalization takes place later this summer. TD Bank CEO Bharat Masrani said the Toronto-based financial institution is studying the issue, and any potential clients in the cannabis industry should have a presence only in countries where recreational or medical cannabis remains legal on a federal level, according to the Canadian Press.

Experts have proposed using medical marijuana to help Americans struggling with opioid addiction. Now, two studies suggest that there is merit to that strategy.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Protections for medical marijuana programs were included in the recently passed budget bill.

The amendment to protect state-approved medical cannabis programs, known as the Rohrabacher-Blumenauer amendment, has been included in the federal omnibus funding package, which would keep the programs safe from federal interference until at least September.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions will be prohibited from going after state medical marijuana growers, retailers, and patients for at least another fiscal year.

Hot on hemp? Senator Mitch McConnell wants to remove it from the controlled substances list.

While in his home state of Kentucky, McConnell announced he will introduce a bill to legalize hemp as an “agricultural commodity.”

The head of the U.S. Senate announced on Monday that he will soon be filing a bill to legalize industrial hemp and allocate federal money for cultivation of the crop.

Thinking of majoring in marijuana in college?  You can do that in Pennsylvania.

Pennsylvania’s Department of Health has released application rules for universities and hospitals in the state interested in researching medical marijuana.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at legalized marijuana.  And what a week it was!  From California’s legalization of recreational pot to the rescinding of the Cole Memorandum, this has been a roller coaster ride for the industry.

Let’s start with California’s legalization:

LOS ANGELES (AP) — California on Monday becomes the nation’s largest state to offer legal recreational marijuana sales.

For the Bay Area’s cannabis community, legalization means reckoning with capitalism never imagined in Haight-Ashbury’s “turn on, tune in, drop out”  ethos of the late ’60s.

Continue Reading The Week in Weed: January 5, 2018

According to reports appearing this morning in the New York Times and the Washington Post, Attorney General Sessions is expected to rescind the Cole Memorandum later today.  The Cole Memorandum is a Department of Justice policy that strongly discourages federal prosecutors from enforcing federal marijuana laws in states in which possession and use of marijuana is legal under state law.

Sessions has long been a critic of legalizing marijuana use, but until now has taken no tangible steps to halt its use in states which have legalized it.  Rescinding the Cole Memorandum makes it easier for federal prosecutors to commence criminal actions against companies and individuals in the cannabis industry.  Even with yesterday’s appointment of seventeen new US Attorneys, it remains to be seen whether federal enforcement of marijuana laws will increase as a result of the recession of the Cole Memorandum.  Whether or not federal prosecutions increase, the rescission of the Cole Memorandum is sure to cause many businesses and investors in the cannabis industry to rethink their strategies.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Documents reveal the AG is seeking approval to crack down on marijuana in states that have passed pro-pot laws.

See TBT’s take on this story here: Sessions Seeks Repeal of Rohrabacher-Farr

A sharply divided legislative committee in Massachusetts voted Wednesday to advance a bill calling for major changes to the voter-approved recreational marijuana law, including higher taxes on retail sales and handing more control over cannabis shops to municipal officials.

If Nevada officials have their way, tourists and residents will be able to buy pot legally ahead of Independence Day.  But before recreational marijuana launches in the state best known for slot machines and showgirls, a judge must decide who has the right to distribute Nevada’s newest cash crop.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

We recently reported on the inclusion of the Rohrabacher-Farr Amendment in the current Congressional budget deal.  The controversy over whether the Justice Department should be permitted to enforce federal laws in states where marijuana is legal for medical purposes only seemed settled, at least until the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2017 expires in late September.  Due to the signing statement that President Trump issued when approving the Act, however, we may have blogged too soon. Continue Reading Reading the Signs: Is a Marijuana Crackdown in Our Future?

The appointment of Jeff Sessions as Attorney General created a great deal of uncertainty in the medical marijuana community.  Sessions has a long history of opposing the legalization of marijuana, whether for medical or recreational purposes.  “Marijuana is against federal law, and that applies in states where they may have repealed their own anti-marijuana laws. So yes, we will enforce law in an appropriate way nationwide,” Sessions said in an interview with radio talk show host Hugh Hewitt in March. Continue Reading See You in September: Rohrabacher-Farr Amendment in Budget Deal