Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Less than two months after California’s legal cannabis industry launched on New Year’s Day, state officials are starting to target hundreds of marijuana companies that are operating illegally without a license.

As the opioid crisis deepens, an increasing number of researchers and advocates are looking at legal marijuana as a possible solution.

A bipartisan bill was offered in the House on Thursday seeking to circumvent attempts by Attorney General Jeff Sessions to encourage stricter enforcement of federal marijuana laws in states where the drug is legal.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Two weeks ago, we reported on San Francisco’s decision to wipe out past marijuana convictions.  Now Seattle is following suit.

Five years after Washington state legalized marijuana, Seattle officials say they’re moving to automatically clear past misdemeanor convictions for pot possession.

Washington voters moved to legalize the drug in 2012.

City of Seattle to Nullify All Misdemeanor Marijuana Possession Convictions From Years Prior to Legalization.

Meanwhile, our neighbors to the north are making deals with companies ahead of legalization.

The Ontario government has inked a deal to use Shopify Inc.’s e-commerce platform for cannabis sales online and in stores as part of its plan to be the province’s sole distributor of legal recreational marijuana.

Six companies announced they have signed letters of intent with Quebec’s liquor board to supply cannabis and related products.

If you’re wondering how many dispensaries are operational in states where medical marijuana is legal, this listing will be of use.

Seeing how many dispensaries are in each state is a perfect illustration of evolving marijuana laws.

In October 2017, Green Solution Retail, Inc., a cannabis retailer, petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court (SCOTUS) to review a decision which held that the Anti-Injunction Act and Declaratory Judgment Act barred Green Solution’s request to enjoin the IRS from enforcing § 280E of the Internal Revenue Code. Continue Reading The High Court Could Review the IRS’ Power to Investigate and Determine Whether Cannabis Dispensaries Engage in Illegal Activities

The California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH) recently held advisory meetings on the Agency’s draft rules for the Marijuana/Cannabis Industry and for the Heat Illness Prevention in Indoor Places of Employment.  It is seeking public comments. Continue Reading Cal/OSHA Drafts Rules for the Marijuana/Cannabis Industry and Heat Illness Prevention in Indoor Places of Employment

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

One of the problems with a new industry is coordinating supply and demand.  Maybe Oregon and California could work together to solve both their problems.

Oregon’s top federal prosecutor said the state has a “formidable” problem with marijuana overproduction that winds up on the black market.

California’s top cannabis regulator said the state deserves credit for a successful rollout of retail marijuana sales, but acknowledged that significant issues loom in the near future.

Another week, another bit of marijuana banking news, as Fourth Corner Credit Union will be able to serve the industry – but there’s a catch.

Fourth Corner Credit Union will be allowed to bank marijuana related business but has to stay away from dispensaries, Fed says.

Fourth Corner won’t serve dispensaries, focusing on ancillary businesses such as accountants and landlords.

And finally, a useful survey from The Cannabist.

It’s been a month since U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded the Cole Memo, Obama-era Department of Justice guidance on enforcement of federal law in states that legalized marijuana in some form.

On November 8, 2016, Maine voters approved “Question 1 – An Act to Legalize Marijuana” (“the Act”), which allows for, among other things, the recreational use of marijuana. The Act contains within it an anti-discrimination in employment provision, which is effective today, February 1, 2018, making it the first law of its kind in the nation because it protects employees and applicants from adverse employment action based on their use of off-duty and off-site marijuana.
Continue Reading Maine Employees Now Protected From Repercussions of Off-Duty Marijuana Use

The San Francisco District Attorney’s Office has announced that it will retroactively apply Proposition 64, which legalized the possession and recreational use of marijuana in California, to marijuana related misdemeanor and felony convictions dating back to 1975 with immediate effect.  As a result, over 3,000 misdemeanor convictions will be dismissed and sealed, and nearly 5,000 felony convictions will be reviewed and potentially reduced. Continue Reading San Francisco DA’s Office to Dismiss Thousands of Marijuana Convictions

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

One of the biggest problems the legal marijuana industry faces is the lack of access to banking services.  California is looking to change that.

Following up on a plan he announced last year, California state Treasurer John Chiang on Tuesday outlined the foundation for a public bank for cannabis businesses so they won’t have to operate on a cash-only basis.

California’s treasurer and attorney general will study whether the state should create its own publicly owned bank to serve the state’s now-legal cannabis industry.

Continue Reading The Week in Weed: February 2, 2018

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

The big story this week was Vermont’s legalization of recreational marijuana.  See our take on this issue here.  This makes nine states (and the District of Columbia) to have legalized; what’s notable is that Vermont is the first state to do so via legislation.

It’s official! Vermont became the ninth state to legalize the recreational use of marijuana on Monday.

This week also brought out some dissent among lawmakers about the new DOJ stance on federal marijuana law enforcement.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Colorado Rep. Jared Polis are leading a bipartisan push urging President Donald Trump to reinstate an Obama-era policy discouraging federal prosecutors from targeting individuals involved in the marijuana trade in states that have legalized the drug.

Continue Reading The Week in Weed: January 26, 2018

On January 22, 2018, Vermont Governor Phil Scott signed H. 511, allowing adults to possess recreational marijuana, making Vermont the first state in the nation to pass such a law in the legislature rather than at the ballot box. Vermont joins eight other states that have legalized recreational marijuana, as well as Washington D.C.  Nearly 30 states, including Vermont and Washington D.C., also have medical marijuana laws on the books. Polls show that most Americans favor legalizing marijuana at the national and local levels. An October 2017 Gallup poll found national support for legalization at the federal level to be at almost 64%. Continue Reading Vermont Legislature Legalizes Recreational Marijuana