Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Ohio’s medical marijuana market was set to open in September, but there’s been a delay.

Ohio had set a Sept. 8 deadline to have a fully operational medical marijuana market. But the state confirmed this week what industry observers have predicted for a while: It’s not going to happen.

In fact, it could take weeks more before medicinal weed is available for patients. Even then, it’s likely to be available only in limited quantities.

More politicians express support for marijuana; the latest legislation seeks to prevent the federal government from interfering in states where it is legal.

The Senators’ Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States Act isn’t a legalization bill, but it would let states chart their own course on cannabis without fear of federal interference.

President Donald Trump said Friday that he was inclined to support a bipartisan effort in Congress to ease the U.S. ban on marijuana, a proposal that would dramatically reshape the nation’s legal landscape for pot users and businesses.

Industrial hemp may be on its way to full legalization.

The farm bill includes hemp legalization legislation that is backed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.  McConnell made a case during Wednesday’s agriculture panel meeting for supporting the hemp legalization.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Marijuana businesses have had real problems finding banking services, but that task may get easier in California.

In order to keep up with the state’s marijuana industry, the California State Senate approves of a measure that would create a bank for the newly legal economy.

The California Senate has advanced Senate Bill 930 — a.k.a. the Cannabis Limited Charter Banking and Credit Union Law — which seeks to establish new rules allowing California banks to serve businesses who are denied banking services due to their involvement in the still federally prohibited cannabis industry.

In other California news, finding insurance coverage may get easier as well.

California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones unveiled a program to provide property and liability coverage for marijuana dispensaries, storage facilities, processors, manufacturers, distributors, and other cannabis-related businesses operating in California.

Could North Carolina be the next state to legalize recreational marijuana?

North Carolina’s legislature is considering a pair of bills that would make it legal to possess up to four ounces of marijuana for personal use.

A Forsyth County legislator is sponsoring a Senate bill that would make it legal to possess up to four ounces of marijuana for personal use.

 

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

We’re about six weeks away from the legalization of marijuana in Canada, but Canadian marijuana stocks are already on the New York Stock Exchange.

Canopy Growth late Wednesday said it expects to begin trading on the NYSE tomorrow, making it one of two Canadian pure-play marijuana stocks to list on a major U.S. exchange.

The only pureplay marijuana stock with any shot at being added to the S&P 500 anytime soon is Canadian-based Canopy Growth Corp.

In Florida, a circuit court judge has ruled a medical marijuana smoking ban unconstitutional.

A Florida judge has ruled the state’s ban on smoking medical cannabis unconstitutional, calling the Legislature-approved ban “invalid and unenforceable.”

In a move that could potentially provide an even bigger boost to growers and retailers in one of the country’s fastest-growing markets, a Florida judge ruled the state’s ban on smokable medical marijuana is unconstitutional.

Cannabis is apparently not immune from the laws of supply and demand, as proven by the situation in Oregon.

When Oregon lawmakers created the state’s legal marijuana program, they had one goal in mind above all else: to convince illicit pot growers to leave the black market.

State regulators say Oregon produced enough recreational cannabis last year to supply every adult resident with more than 5 ounces (140 grams) of legal marijuana.

And finally, birthday greetings to Tommy Chong, who, believe it or not, recently turned 80.

Yeah man, Tommy Chong says he always knew he’d live to see the day marijuana legalization would be sweeping the country.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

The Acting Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration, Robert Patterson, testified to Congress about legalizing marijuana recently.

The nation’s top drug enforcement officer was unflinching in his opposition to legalizing marijuana and apparently not embarrassed by his complete ignorance of the relevant science.

Is state-level medical cannabis access mitigating or fueling America’s opioid crisis? Testifying before Congress last week, Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) acting administrator Robert Patterson claimed the latter. But when he prompted to provide evidence in support of the agency’s position, he acknowledged that he could not.

California released new rules for its marijuana industry, but it didn’t get the attention you might expect.

When California released its latest marijuana industry regulations on Friday, the state industry’s response was, by and large, muted.

With little fanfare, the state of California released its revised cannabis industry regulations last week.

Finally, the only thing better than a marijuana dispensary is a marijuana dispensary with slot machines.

Marijuana stores with slot machines? Casinos with gamblers drawing on vape-pens? Not yet. But early inroads are perhaps being made.

Welcome back to The Weed in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

In what’s become a regular feature, we have more politicians who are coming out in favor of legalized marijuana, or at least, backing away from their previous opposition.

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), a potential 2020 White House contender, is joining Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), who is also speculated to be a possible presidential candidate, in the fight to legalize marijuana under federal law.

After years of halting steps, top prosecutors and elected officials in New York City on Tuesday made a sudden dash toward ending many of the marijuana arrests that for decades have entangled mostly black and Hispanic people.

More states are putting marijuana on the ballot.  Ohio is making a move in that direction.

A proposed constitutional amendment to legalize adult-use marijuana in Ohio has cleared an initial hurdle after winning approval from the state’s top attorney.

A proposed constitutional amendment to legalize recreational marijuana in Ohio completed the first step Thursday in qualifying the measure for a statewide ballot.

So what do you do when marijuana prices tumble?  Start growing hemp.

SPRINGFIELD, Ore. (AP) — A glut of legal marijuana has driven Oregon pot prices to rock-bottom levels, prompting some nervous growers to start pivoting to another type of cannabis to make ends meet — one that doesn’t come with a high.

 

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Colorado was among the first states in the nation to legalize recreational marijuana.  Now, it’s the first state to move on marijuana tasting rooms.

Licensed marijuana “tasting rooms” could be operating in Colorado this time next year if Gov. John Hickenlooper signs a first-of-its-kind bill that state lawmakers sent to his desk Thursday.

Colorado lawmakers on Thursday approved pioneering legislation allowing marijuana retailers to establish tasting rooms for customers to consume select products – much like a brewery…

One of the selling point of legal cannabis is that it raises government revenue.  Is that actually true?

A new report finds that legalizing and taxing marijuana boosts revenue for state and local governments, but not by much.

Tax revenue from recreational marijuana makes up a small percentage of annual general fund revenues in states with the most established retail markets, such as Colorado, Washington and Oregon, Moody’s Investors Service said on Tuesday.

But what about government spending on marijuana?  Specifically on beer and marijuana?

The Ontario government has contributed $300,000 to help a Toronto company work with Loyalist College in Belleville to develop what it says will be the world’s first beer brewed from cannabis.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Could legal recreational marijuana be in Michigan’s future?  A referendum may be on the November ballot.

Associated Press and Gongwer News Service – Michigan’s elections board said organizers collected enough signatures, but the measure will first go to the Republican-led Legislature, which could enact it or let it proceed to a statewide vote.

In other state news, Missouri is moving towards legal medical marijuana.  The state House has voted in favor of a bill to give access to terminal patients.

Missouri’s House has passed a medical cannabis measure that would allow individuals with terminal illness and 11 other conditions to access the program, the Columbia Missourian reports.

When marijuana becomes legal in a jurisdiction, what happens to all those old arrests?  Seattle is going to expunge them.

Seattle’s mayor says it will help “right the wrongs of the failed War on Drugs.”

And in what is becoming a continuing series, another politician is speaking out in favor of legal marijuana.  This time, it’s Democrat Dianne Feinstein.

The California senator, a longtime opponent of legalization, says she’s come around.

Finally, have you wondered when the craft beer industry would jump on the marijuana bandwagon?  The answer is this fall.

Keith Villa, the man who created the recipe for the popular Blue Moon beer, has a new project: a marijuana-infused beer made by his new brewing company.

 

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Last week, we reported on prominent Republicans beginning to support (some form of) cannabis.  This week, we see Democrats upping the ante.

The push to decriminalize marijuana has picked up another high-profile backer — Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer — just a week after President Donald Trump endorsed letting states decide how to regulate the drug.

Sen. Bernie Sanders on Thursday became the latest senator to co-sponsor Sen. Cory Booker’s bill that would legalize marijuana.

Now that GOP senators are coming out in support of legalization, Democrats may be playing a game of catch-up that could have consequences at the polls.

And finally, the award for best dispensary name goes to MedMen which recently opened in New York City.

Now that a MedMen dispensary opens in New York City, will New Yorkers have more access to medical marijuana?

Welcome to the 4/20 edition of Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

It’s been a big week for Republicans embracing legal marijuana or marijuana-related products.  Donald Trump, John Boehner and Mitch McConnell have all moved to embrace the plant.

President Donald Trump will lift his administration’s plans for a possible crackdown on states that have legalized marijuana after talks with a Colorado senator, the White House said on Friday, an action that undercuts U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

The former House speaker once said he was “unalterably opposed” to legalization. Now, after joining a cannabis company’s board, he is arguing for change.

Today, the Senate Majority Leader has made good on his words. Mitch McConnell has officially filed his promised hemp farming bill.

But it’s not just the Republicans who are giving cannabis a second glance.  Both candidates vying for the Democratic nomination in the New York governor’s race are speaking about legalization.

A week after telling two interviewers her support for legalizing recreational use of marijuana in New York was revenue-based, Democratic candidate for governor Cynthia Nixon said Wednesday that it’s now foremost a racial justice issue for her.

Is the governor paving the way to legalizing recreational marijuana in New York?

In non-political news, it looks like the FDA is going to approve the use of an epilepsy drug made from the marijuana plant.

The medication would treat seizures that typically affect children.

GW Pharma spiked to an 11-week high Tuesday after an internal review hinted at the likelihood the FDA will approve its cannabis-based anti-seizure drug.

Happy 4/20 everyone!  In case you’re wondering about the origins of this celebration, check out Leafly’s article here: The Origin and Meaning of the 4/20 Holiday.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Although marijuana is legal in California on the state level, that doesn’t mean it’s all smooth sailing for the industry.

Nearly 1,000 individual cannabis businesses have been sent cease-and-desist letters or emails by California regulators.

Talk about a buzz kill. The U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals gave the go-ahead to prosecute marijuana growers in California, where voters approved recreational pot nearly two years ago.

A lack of diversity in the marijuana industry has been a problem for the state of Maryland, but the legislature is seeking to address that.

The bill includes language which would force regulators to consider race and barriers for minorities, including women, with the issuance of those licenses.

Maryland lawmakers agreed to expand the state’s medical marijuana industry, in large part to resolve a conflict over minority representation in the business.

And finally, perhaps the future tagline will be, “Have a toke and a smile.”

The U.S. legal cannabis industry is expected to reach $75 billion in sales by 2030, according to research firm Cowen & Co.