Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

O Canada!  Obviously, the big news this week is that marijuana is now legal in Canada.

The B.C. government is touting the success of the province’s online cannabis store, which went live shortly after midnight.

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale says coming legislation will waive the waiting period and fee for those seeking a pardon for possession offences.

Unlikely as it seems, Canada’s first day as the world’s largest legal marijuana marketplace turned out to be pretty much just another day.

Recreational marijuana is legal as of today, but the vision of what a pot-permissive Canada looks like remains somewhat hazy.

The National Hockey League (NHL) will maintain its neutral stance on pro players’ cannabis use after legalization takes effect across Canada this Wednesday, according to a Yahoo Sports report.

 

 

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Here at The Blunt Truth, we are well aware of the difficulties cannabis businesses face in obtaining financial services.  It turns out, even political groups that support marijuana legalization can face a problem with banks.

A new cannabis political action committee, Californians for Sensible Regulation of Adult Use, is looking to raise $300,000 by 2020 to support industry-friendly candidates for public office in key jurisdictions of the state.

In the latest installment of “people changing their minds on marijuana,” the Mormon Church and cannabis advocates have reached a compromise on legalizing medical marijuana ahead of next month’s election, which features a ballot initiative to allow MMJ.

Those behind the campaign to legalize medical marijuana and some of its most vocal opponents have reached a tentative agreement on what medical marijuana policy should look like in Utah, the Deseret News has learned.

As we reported last weekthe Food and Drug Administration has allowed the sale of Epidiolex, which contains CBD derived from cannabis.  Apparently, that’s not the only move on marijuana the agency has made recently.

FDA officials have put out a call for public comment about the potential rescheduling of cannabis and several other substances.

Despite Michigan’s prohibition against cannabis-infused beverages, alcohol companies are actively pursuing the market.

A former Molson Coors exec will head its cannabis-drinks JV, called Truss. New Age Beverages is fielding requests for its CBD drinks.

And this just in: the Border Patrol has revised its lifetime ban against Canadians involved in cannabis.

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency (CBP) has announced that Canadians who work in the legal cannabis industry will generally be allowed to enter the United States.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Things in New Jersey have changed considerably with the end of Chris Christie’s term as governor, especially as concerns marijuana.

New Jersey’s top lawmaker has set a new date for at least one house of the state Legislature to vote legalizing recreational marijuana in the Garden State: Oct. 29.

Banking issues are a constant theme of this email, as the lack of financial services impedes the industry’s growth and states call on the federal government to step up.

Hawaii’s top banking regulator joined the growing chorus of state leaders urging Congress to consider banking solutions for the cannabis industry.

Meanwhile, in California, expungement is about to get much easier.

Hailed by advocates as a chance for people to “reclaim their lives,” a new California law will soon make it easier for people with past marijuana convictions to get their records expunged completely, or their sentences significantly reduced.

And finally, if you’re intrigued at the thought of a marijuana/beer mashup, you won’t be able to try it in Michigan.

Legislation that would prohibit the use, possession or sale of cannabis-infused beer, wine, liquor and mixed drinks in Michigan was approved by the state House on Tuesday by a 101-4 vote.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Big legalization news from the Northern Mariana Islands – they’ve legalized marijuana and they’ve done it via legislation.

On Friday, Gov. Ralph Torres of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), a U.S. territory, signed a cannabis legalization bill into law.

Meanwhile, back on the U.S. mainland, voters in Utah will be voting on whether to allow medical marijuana in the state.

Utah’s Prop 2 is fast becoming a struggle between supporters of medical marijuana and the Mormon church.

No matter who wins Utah’s U.S. Senate race in November, the Beehive State will have an advocate in Washington, D.C., for moving marijuana off the list of Schedule 1 controlled substances, a designation that cannabis now shares with heroin, LSD and ecstasy.

And finally, here’s yet another reason to make Las Vegas your vacation destination.

LAS VEGAS — A glass bong taller than a giraffe. Huggable faux marijuana buds. A pool full of foam weed nuggets. Las Vegas’ newest attraction — and Instagram backdrop — is a museum celebrating all things cannabis.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Once marijuana is legal in a state, the process for providing it is just beginning.  And that process can be fraught with difficulty, as the state of Ohio is finding out.

Ohio’s auditor said the state’s process for selecting medical marijuana grower applicants suffered from numerous errors and inconsistencies.

Meanwhile, the federal government is moving closer to approving more licenses to grow marijuana for research.  But there’s drama here too: a provision that those with prior drug convictions need not apply.

A powerful U.S. House panel that oversees federal drug enforcement efforts approved a bill on Thursday to require the Department of Justice and Attorney General Jeff Sessions to begin issuing more licenses to grow marijuana for research.

This greater interest in marijuana research will be of no help to Canadian cannabis workers, who are facing a lifetime ban at the border.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Tuesday that he will not “impress upon the U.S. who they have to let in or not.”

And finally, we couldn’t help but include this story that combines Maine lobster and marijuana.

Lobsters in one Maine restaurant go out in a blaze of glory once they hit the pot. The owner of a lobster joint is sedating her crustaceans with marijuana smoke before cooking them — which she says gives them a blissfully humane death.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

The latest entry in our “politicians now supporting marijuana” category is Rep. Pete Sessions (R-TX).  And no, he’s no relation to Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

The move would be a full 180 for Sessions, who has personally blocked dozens of cannabis policy amendments and bills from consideration on the floor of the House via the Rules Committee, which he chairs.

Not all government officials are in favor of legalization, however.  The former attorney general of North Dakota is actively working against the ballot initiative.

As North Dakota voters look to decide whether to approve adult-use cannabis in the state’s November general election, opposition is mounting.

Apparently, it’s not just young people using cannabis.  Older Americans are lighting up as well.

Boomers are experimenting with marijuana more than ever before.

Finally, when Canada legalized marijuana, it was only a matter of time before the National Hockey League had to issue a statement.

Deputy commissioner Bill Daly says the NHL does not expect to change its rules on marijuana with the legalization of cannabis in Canada coming on Oct. 17.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Following up on last week’s look at an expungement proposal in California, this week we note that Delaware has enacted such a statute.

Expungement is mandatory but not automatic; eligible individuals still need to apply and pay a fee.

When we wrote about North Dakota’s effort to legalize recreational cannabis, we thought that was pretty surprising.  We had no idea that Mississippi was looking to put medical marijuana on the 2020 ballot.

A group in Mississippi, one of the country’s most conservative states, is aiming to put what looks to be a business-friendly medical marijuana initiative on the ballot in 2020.

Not all the action is on the state level; new legislation on the federal level would allow veterans access to medical marijuana.

Veterans Affairs doctors are currently prohibited from prescribing the drug by federal law.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Most employers are wary of union organizing, but a marijuana retailer in Washington is supportive of the idea.

A cannabis retailer led efforts to have his employees join a union in an unusual labor organizing drive in Washington.

Once recreational marijuana in legal in a state,  what does the state do about criminal records?

A measure passed by the legislature would require a review of all marijuana-related crimes in the state between 1975 and 2016, when pot was legalized in California.

Not everyone is in favor of expanding access to medical marijuana; the Mormon Church is opposed to allowing MMJ in Utah.

The Mormon church ramped up its opposition this week to a proposal that would allow medical marijuana in Utah, even as faith leaders insisted they support patients using it under strict controls.

Finally, just because you’re seizing someone’s illegal cannabis plants doesn’t mean you can’t also have a sense of humor about it.

Police in Marlborough, New Hampshire confiscated 25 cannabis plants growing on private land and then did something unexpected —they joked about it, reports The Boston Globe.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

As long time readers of this blog know, banking for cannabis companies is problematic to say the least.  California has decided not to pursue allowing state banks to handle the industry’s money.

California lawmakers deferred a plan that would have allowed private banks to handle the money being generated by the legal cannabis industry.

In other Golden State news, revenues from marijuana sales have been disappointing.

Why is California’s tax revenue from legal marijuana not meeting expectations?

Meanwhile, in Louisiana,  medical marijuana planting has begun.

Louisiana’s first legal crop of medical marijuana can be planted this week. Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain, whose agency regulates the burgeoning industry, loosened a regulatory logjam that created a months-long delay.

Finally, one of the more surprising additions to our list of politicians (or in this case, government entities) who have changed their mind on marijuana:

The anti-drug agency is moving to more than quintuple the amount of cannabis that can legally be grown in the U.S. for research purposes—from roughly 1,000 pounds in 2018 to more than 5,400 pounds next year.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

At the risk of turning this into the “Week in Oklahoma Weed,” here’s the latest on what happening in the Sooner State.

A group that wants to legalize recreational marijuana in Oklahoma has submitted signatures to qualify the measure for a statewide vote after saying it may not have enough to qualify for the November ballot.

And for further proof it’s not just the coasts that are thinking of legalizing recreational cannabis, we have this news from the Upper Midwest.

North Dakota will vote on whether to legalize marijuana for recreational use after a measure was approved for the November ballot on Monday.

North Dakotans will vote this November on a ballot measure to legalize recreational marijuana, state officials announced Monday.

You will doubtless recall that the FDA approved a CBD medication recently.  We now know what the price tag will be.

GW Pharmaceuticals has revealed the expected consumer price for Epidiolex, the first cannabidiol-based medication to be approved by the FDA, according to a Business Insider report.