Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Although the Department of Justice has made its position on legalized marijuana clear, other government entities are not following Attorney General Sessions’ lead.  In Congress, a House bill (a companion to Senator Cory Booker’s bill) was introduced by Representative Barbara Lee.

The House version of the Marijuana Justice Act marks the first time that companion legislation has been introduced in both chambers of Congress to remove marijuana from the Controlled Substances Act.

Today, Representatives Barbara Lee (D-CA-13) and Ro Khanna (D-CA-17) introduced legislation that ends federal marijuana prohibition and which contains a range of provisions to repair communities most devastated by the war on drugs.

And the states are pushing ahead with their legalization plans, Cole Memorandum or no Cole Memorandum.

Sen. Dan Seum said Wednesday that Kentucky should join the legalization trend flourishing elsewhere.

Democratic candidate for governor Matt Flynn says if elected he would pardon everyone who has low-level marijuana convictions.

Nevada regulators have tentatively given cannabis retailers a green light to begin home deliveries for the first time since recreational sales became legal.

Meanwhile, what does rescinding the Cole Memorandum mean for banking guidance issued by FinCEN and marijuana banking generally?

A top official at the U.S. Department of the Treasury said Wednesday its financial intelligence unit is reviewing guidance that allowed banks to serve marijuana businesses.

A letter from Reps. Perlmutter and Heck in support of Obama-era marijuana banking guidance has been signed by 29 additional members of Congress.

A letter to 10 major Congressional leaders from 19 attorneys general asks Congress to push through legislation that would allow states with medical or recreational marijuana laws to bank as other business do.

Are the feds and the states on a collision course?  As always, stay tuned!

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.  Happily, this week was less tumultuous than last, but there’s still some news to digest.

Despite the news coming from the Justice Department last week, some states are moving to legalize weed use.

(Reuters) – Vermont’s senate on Wednesday passed a bill to legalize recreational marijuana use, which would make the state the first in the nation to do so through the legislative process rather than a ballot initiative.

The marijuana movement is charging ahead. To date eight states — California, Colorado, Nevada to name a few — have legalized weed for recreational use since 2012. And the trend continues. 

Meanwhile, our friends to the north are taking their marijuana businesses global.

A major Canadian licensed producer has sealed an arrangement with a Dutch pharmaceutical distributor to market and sell its medical marijuana products in 17 countries.

A Toronto company billing itself as the “WebMD of medical cannabis” has acquired Massachusetts-based Canna Care Docs, which certifies MMJ patients in 21 “evaluation centers” across nine states.

Will more states legalize?  Will Canada become the world leader in pot distribution?  Only time will tell…

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at legalized marijuana.  And what a week it was!  From California’s legalization of recreational pot to the rescinding of the Cole Memorandum, this has been a roller coaster ride for the industry.

Let’s start with California’s legalization:

LOS ANGELES (AP) — California on Monday becomes the nation’s largest state to offer legal recreational marijuana sales.

For the Bay Area’s cannabis community, legalization means reckoning with capitalism never imagined in Haight-Ashbury’s “turn on, tune in, drop out”  ethos of the late ’60s.

Recreational cannabis sales officially begin in California today, but fewer than 100 adult-use retail licenses have been issued throughout the state – which may lead to long lines and out-of-stock issues for the rec stores able to open their doors on New Year’s Day.

Marijuana is now legal in California for adults 21 and older, and individuals can grow up to six plants and possess as much as an ounce.

So as the week began, the industry was “riding high.”  But what goes up, must come down.  So let’s have a look at Thursday’s news:

The Trump administration on Thursday will free federal prosecutors to more aggressively enforce marijuana laws, effectively threatening to undermine the legalization movement that has spread to six states, most recently California.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is rescinding an Obama-era directive that discouraged enforcement of federal marijuana laws in states that had legalized the substance, according to people familiar with the decision.

In a seismic shift, Attorney General Jeff Sessions will announce Thursday that he is rescinding a trio of memos from the Obama administration that adopted a policy of non-interference with marijuana-friendly state laws, according to a source with knowledge of the decision.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is rescinding the Obama-era policy that had paved the way for legalized marijuana to flourish in states across the country, two people with knowledge of the decision told The Associated Press.

2018 is starting off with a bang!

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Pot smokers in California are counting down to the New Year’s “toke of midnight.” On Jan. 1, the nation’s most populous state will become the eighth (along with Washington, D.C.) to have legalized recreational marijuana.

It was a lung-busting 2017 for the North American cannabis industry, with marijuana executives stateside holding their collective breath wondering whether the new Trump administration would crack down on legal MJ businesses.

First Green Bank, a community bank that was handling accounts for six of the state’s seven licensed producers of medical marijuana announced it is closing the accounts of its cannabis clients.

This announcement may have huge implications for the cannabis industry.

That’s our last report for 2017 – we wish everyone a Happy New Year!

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Mexico will legalize sales of marijuana-based medicines, foods, drinks, cosmetics and other products early next year, its health regulator said on Wednesday, bringing some forms of cannabis into legal commerce even as the country struggles with the illicit drug trade.

The directive changes policy to support “the Veteran – (health) provider relationship when discussing the use of marijuana and its impact on health, including Veteran-specific treatment plans.”

A Florida-based company whose software helps marijuana retailers implement customer relationship and loyalty strategies has raised $3.2 million.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Legal marijuana is certain to appeal to the 9 million annual visitors but industrial hemp also could boost self-reliance in the Aloha State.

Colorado’s largest city is reviewing the first application from a business seeking to be among the nation’s first legal marijuana clubs, a step that comes more than a year after voters approved a bring-your-own pot measure.

On November 30, 2017, the Constitutional Court of Georgia decriminalized the personal use of marijuana and other cannabis-based products.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

That’s a record high.

The Los Angeles City Council approved a dense set of recreational marijuana regulations for cultivation, sales and business licensing.

With the current federal budget set to expire Friday, speculation has swirled in Washington DC over whether Congress will once again reach a deal to keep the old budget in place temporarily and prevent the U.S. government from shutting down.  Medical marijuana businesses have good reason to pay attention: If the previous budget is not extended – as it has already been multiple times this year – it means the federal protections of the Rohrabacher-Blumenauer Amendment will also evaporate.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

The expansion of California’s legal marijuana industry will bring a major cash problem.

The first cannabis dispensaries are set to open in Maryland, nearly five years after state lawmakers legalized marijuana for medical use.

The Trump administration should carefully consider how legalizing marijuana can help reduce opioid addiction and overdose deaths, Sen. Elizabeth Warren says.

And in case you needed any further proof that the Chris Christie era is over in New Jersey…

The momentum to legalize recreational cannabis in New Jersey continues to grow.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

A U.S. alcohol maker’s $191 million investment in Canadian cannabis could raise difficult questions for the banks that have lent big sums of money to the company.

LeafLink, an online inventory and ordering platform for marijuana businesses, has raised $10 million in Series A funding.

A Michigan group has submitted more than 360,000 voter signatures in a bid to put legalization of recreational marijuana to a statewide vote in 2018.

In keeping with the holiday spirit, we would like to take a moment to thank you, our readers.  It’s a pleasure to provide you with this post every week, and we hope you are enjoying a lovely long weekend.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

An Arizona attorney has filed a lawsuit asking the state’s Court of Appeals to decide whether the $150 patient card fee is legal, a move that could affect Arizona’s medical marijuana market.

A bill that would legalize marijuana in New Hampshire has been rejected by the House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee.

They say the Controlled Substance Act is unconstitutional.

And finally, remember, marijuana may be legal where you live, either medically or recreationally, but it is not legal to send marijuana through the mail.  Even if you construct your own fake boulders to do it.

Police say an Oregon man shipped more than $1 million worth of marijuana to another state via UPS last week, packing the drugs inside of artificial boulders he made himself.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.