Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Arizona’s medical marijuana sales jumped a whopping 41% in 2018 – sales are estimated to have been $400 million.  Not chump change by anyone’s standards.

Regular readers will doubtless recall that Arkansas’ medical marijuana program was off to a sluggish start.  They have finally issued the first dispensary licenses and cultivation sites are now all under construction.

Connecticut is looking to legalize marijuana – a new legalization bill has just been introduced.  New England is rapidly giving the West Coast a run for its money as a leader in cannabis legalization.

Turning our attention to the Caribbean, Puerto Rico marijuana businesses are now without a banking option.  Not surprisingly, those in the industry are concerned about the safety issues inherent in operating in a cash-only environment.  Meanwhile, in the U.S. Virgin Islands, medical marijuana is now legal.  The hope is that this may spur additional tourism.

CBS has announced that it will not air a medical marijuana ad during the Super Bowl.  One wonders if this is the kind of decision that will provoke laughter in years to come.

And finally, if you’re a furloughed federal worker, check out the website offering free cannabis.

Can employers deny employment to people who use cannabis under a medical prescription authorized by state law? In more and more states, the answer is now “No.”

Changes in cannabis laws are creating a new haze for employers. What follows is a quick summary citing some (not all) states that now require employers to think twice before denying employment to individuals because they tested positive for the use of marijuana that they are ingesting for state-authorized medical reasons. Continue Reading Budding Development: States Requiring Employers to Tolerate Medical Cannabis Use

A recently-filed lawsuit in the federal district court in Arizona alleges that an employee’s use of medical marijuana may be permissible under the federal Americans With Disabilities Act (“ADA”).  Although the employee faces an uphill battle, the case presents a challenge to the commonly-held view that the ADA does not support such a claim.

In Terry v. United Parcel Services, Inc., No. 2:17-cv-04972-PHX-DJB (D. Ariz., filed Dec. 29, 2017), a former UPS sales director alleges, among other things, that UPS terminated his employment in violation of the ADA and the Arizona Medical Marijuana Act (“AMMA”).  Terry alleges that he was a medical marijuana card holder under the AMMA, and that, at the direction of his doctor, he used medical marijuana during non-work hours to treat his nearly constant and extreme hip pain.  He claims that he never possessed, used, or was impaired by marijuana, alcohol, or any other impairing substance while present on UPS’s premises or during working hours.  According to the complaint, in April 2017, UPS required Terry to report immediately for a drug and alcohol screening test, and was informed that the reason for the test was “observable behavior.”  At a meeting with UPS officials one week later, Terry claims that UPS terminated his employment due to his positive drug and alcohol screening results and violating the company’s drug and alcohol policy.  Terry claims that he responded by notifying UPS that he has a valid medical marijuana card under the AMMA and a valid prescription for Adderall that he took to treat his ADD. Continue Reading A Potential P[l]ot Twist for Medical Marijuana and the ADA

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

An Arizona attorney has filed a lawsuit asking the state’s Court of Appeals to decide whether the $150 patient card fee is legal, a move that could affect Arizona’s medical marijuana market.

A bill that would legalize marijuana in New Hampshire has been rejected by the House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee.

They say the Controlled Substance Act is unconstitutional.

And finally, remember, marijuana may be legal where you live, either medically or recreationally, but it is not legal to send marijuana through the mail.  Even if you construct your own fake boulders to do it.

Police say an Oregon man shipped more than $1 million worth of marijuana to another state via UPS last week, packing the drugs inside of artificial boulders he made himself.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government will publish draft legislation on the legalisation of marijuana later this week.

A turf war over Arizona’s medical cannabis vaporizer market has spilled into the courts, with one multistate marijuana company suing another over an alleged smear campaign.

This could be the most comprehensive set of cannabis reforms ever presented on Capitol Hill.

And we have to give a shout out to our colleagues at the California peculiarities Employment Law Blog for their piece on drug testing in the Golden State: Marijuana at Work: Testing of (and for) Mary Jane

Something we missed?  Let us know in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Denver officials are working on regulations to open a one-year pilot of bring-your-own marijuana clubs, while state lawmakers are expected to consider measures to allow either marijuana “tasting rooms” run by marijuana dispensaries, or smoke-friendly clubs akin to cigar bars.

Indiana may be well on its way to becoming the next state to legalize a modest medical marijuana program. But make no mistake, it would be one of the most restrictive in the nation.

The first salvo in the recreational marijuana legalization fight for the next election cycle looks set to be fired Thursday, in Phoenix. Safer Arizona 2018, a grassroots activism group, plans to file paperwork with the secretary of state’s office to place an adult-use cannabis legalization initiative on the 2018 statewide ballot, the organization announced Wednesday.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.  And what a week it’s been!

The cannabis industry scored a landslide victory Tuesday as four states legalized recreational marijuana and another three approved medical use, cementing the 2016 election’s place in the history books.

As many like to say, elections have consequences. And this new Washington Post article highlights one really interesting and surprisingly quick consequence of all the marijuana election results.

Four more states legalize recreational marijuana, but it could be moot if newly elected President Trump rolls back the Cole Memorandum, or if Trump appoints either Chris Christie or Rudy Giuliani as attorney general.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

We’re not the only group interested in the legal marijuana aspects of Tuesday’s election.  60 Minutes aired a segment on legal recreational pot last Sunday.

The marijuana industry could quadruple in size after the 2016 elections, according to a new study released Wednesday.

Lawmakers in Colorado on Monday asked an anti-marijuana campaign in Arizona to stop airing ads that they say contain false information about their state and could mislead voters who will be deciding on recreational legalization of the drug next week.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

With only a month to Election Day, The Blunt Truth turns its attention to the ballot measures in nine states that would expand legal access to marijuana.  This week we look at two of the five states— Arizona, California, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada —with ballot measures proposing to legalize recreational marijuana use for anyone 21 and over: Continue Reading RE[e]FERENDUMS: 2016 Marijuana State Ballot Initiatives

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

 

Ohio’s Supreme Court Wednesday proposed rewriting its ethics rules to allow lawyers to help medical marijuana companies, a change that would be welcomed by local attorneys and cannabis entrepreneurs, according to the Columbus Dispatch.

 

Moving to address complaints about the program, the state’s Health Department is making substantial changes aimed at easing access to the drug.

 

A voter initiative legalizing recreational marijuana will be on the November ballot after the Arizona Supreme Court on Wednesday rejected a final legal challenge to the measure.

 

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