Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Let’s start off this week’s post with some international news.  The World Health Organization is recommending that cannabis should be removed as a controlled substance under international treaties.  The recommendations will come up for a vote in March of this year.

Banking for the cannabis industry is a subject we watch closely.  In California, it’s been revealed that a credit union has surreptitiously (until now) been providing financial services to several marijuana businesses for the past year.

Turning our attention to the Midwest, which does seem to be the latest hotbed of cannabis activity, we find that Ohio medical marijuana sales have been very strong.  Illinois is now allowing those prescribed opioids to obtain temporary certification for medical cannabis.  Yet another indication that full legalization is in the cards?

Following up on our Tennessee coverage, the legislature is now considering validating out-of-state medical marijuana cards for use in the Volunteer State.  And Arkansas has now licensed 32 medical cannabis dispensaries, with sales possible by April.

New York looked as if it was on the verge of full legalization, but that may have changed.  Governor Cuomo’s budget does not include any additional money for law enforcement dealing with a new set of circumstances after legalization.  We’ll keep our eye on this situation, obviously.

And finally, if you had to pick a stock ticker symbol for a cannabis company, could you do any better than POT?

 

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Arizona’s medical marijuana sales jumped a whopping 41% in 2018 – sales are estimated to have been $400 million.  Not chump change by anyone’s standards.

Regular readers will doubtless recall that Arkansas’ medical marijuana program was off to a sluggish start.  They have finally issued the first dispensary licenses and cultivation sites are now all under construction.

Connecticut is looking to legalize marijuana – a new legalization bill has just been introduced.  New England is rapidly giving the West Coast a run for its money as a leader in cannabis legalization.

Turning our attention to the Caribbean, Puerto Rico marijuana businesses are now without a banking option.  Not surprisingly, those in the industry are concerned about the safety issues inherent in operating in a cash-only environment.  Meanwhile, in the U.S. Virgin Islands, medical marijuana is now legal.  The hope is that this may spur additional tourism.

CBS has announced that it will not air a medical marijuana ad during the Super Bowl.  One wonders if this is the kind of decision that will provoke laughter in years to come.

And finally, if you’re a furloughed federal worker, check out the website offering free cannabis.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

The big news this week is that the governor of Washington is going to issue pardons to those convicted of misdemeanors involving marijuana.  Known as the Marijuana Justice Initiative, the program has limitations on who is eligible for the pardon but is expected to effect over 3,000 citizens.

Further down the West Coast, times are changing in California.  This week marked the end of the state’s unlicensed medical marijuana dispensaries.  They had been allowed to operate as medical cooperatives for a year after the issuance of guidance from the Bureau of Cannabis Control, but as of January 10, they need to get permits.

Meanwhile, is there a border skirmish going on involving Oklahoma and Arkansas?  Arkansas’ medical marijuana program is two years old, but no licenses have yet been issued to patients or dispensaries.  Patients interested in purchasing cannabis had been looking to neighboring Oklahoma, whose seven month old program has already issued multiple dispensary licenses and seemed eager to accept Arkansans as customers.

So what’s the hitch?  Customers from out of state need to have valid licenses from their own state in order to be able to buy marijuana in Oklahoma.  Happily, this week, Arkansas has issued licenses to medical marijuana dispensaries in the state.  But (and isn’t there always a but?), the governor of Arkansas has warned patients that transporting cannabis across state lines is still a crime.

In other Oklahoma news, the governor has given her OK (no pun intended) to new rules for medical marijuana edibles.

And in a new segment we’re calling, “Places You Wouldn’t Have Guessed Are Talking About Legal Marijuana,”  our first spotlight shines on Idaho, South Carolina, Kentucky and Virginia.  Clearly, it’s a big spotlight.

Finally, in a mash-up of cold brew and cannabis, one Missouri coffee company has a new product.  We at WIW are a bit confused as to exactly what this concoction is supposed to do.  To quote from High Times,  “Many have pointed out that the merger combines two substances with what may seem like contradictory effects, given CBD’s reputation as a relaxer.”

That’s all for this week – see you next Friday!

 

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Colorado has made more than half a billion dollars from taxing marijuana since recreational sales became legal in the state three years ago.

Next week, Uruguay will begin sales of legal marijuana for adult residents.

The first municipality in Arkansas has granted formal approval to local rules that will govern medical marijuana companies that operate within its borders, setting the stage for the rest of the state to follow suit.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know? Give us a shout in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

The Arkansas Alcoholic Beverage Control Board gave approval for state-licensed dispensaries to deliver medical marijuana to patients and caregivers once the state’s MMJ program has launched.

The inherent tension in the recent trend to legalize recreational marijuana at the state level is that the drug remains an illegal substance at the federal level.

Fighting a slow-moving bureaucracy, the overwhelming majority of companies seeking recreational marijuana business licenses in Portland, Oregon, are stuck in various stages of the city’s application process.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at the world of legalized marijuana.  The big news is that Ohio has now officially legalized medical marijuana (medijuana, as we like to call it).  See TBT’s post on that here.  But that’s not the only thing that’s been going on.

They doubled in Washington state.

Two campaigns to legalize medical cannabis in Arkansas could wind up killing each other in November if both of them somehow qualify for the ballot.
In today’s digital age, you can summon a pizza via text message or organize a meet-up in minutes via social media. But for a long time, the marijuana industry wasn’t on that technology bandwagon.
Anything we missed that everyone needs to know?  Fill us in through the comment section.