drug enforcement administration

Welcome to our end of the year wrap-up post for The Week in Weed; it’s hard to believe another year has come and (almost) gone, but the calendar doesn’t lie.  In what we are calling an homage to Dave Barry and his always hilarious Year in Review, we’ll organize these stories by month.

Without further ado, here’s a look at the stories that grabbed our attention in 2018. Continue Reading The Week, No Make that the Year, in Weed: 2018

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

As long time readers of this blog know, banking for cannabis companies is problematic to say the least.  California has decided not to pursue allowing state banks to handle the industry’s money.

California lawmakers deferred a plan that would have allowed private banks to handle the money being generated by the legal cannabis industry.

In other Golden State news, revenues from marijuana sales have been disappointing.

Why is California’s tax revenue from legal marijuana not meeting expectations?

Meanwhile, in Louisiana,  medical marijuana planting has begun.

Louisiana’s first legal crop of medical marijuana can be planted this week. Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain, whose agency regulates the burgeoning industry, loosened a regulatory logjam that created a months-long delay.

Finally, one of the more surprising additions to our list of politicians (or in this case, government entities) who have changed their mind on marijuana:

The anti-drug agency is moving to more than quintuple the amount of cannabis that can legally be grown in the U.S. for research purposes—from roughly 1,000 pounds in 2018 to more than 5,400 pounds next year.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

The city’s lawmakers are legitimizing and regulating marijuana businesses before the state fully legalizes recreational marijuana use in January 2018.

Authorities in Bexar County, Texas, which includes San Antonio, are seeking to have misdemeanor offenders found with marijuana receive a citation, not jail.

Chuck Rosenberg, who has been the acting administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration since 2015, said Tuesday he’ll be leaving the job. That means President Donald Trump will get to appoint a successor.

And finally, if you’re thinking that brick and mortar sales are a bit old-fashioned, Maine is way ahead of you.  My question: can you get fries with that?

Where the winters are very long, the law might allow for the legal purchase of marijuana without leaving home, or at least your car.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?   Give us a shout in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

It was 1911. The New England Watch and Ward Society (née the New England Society for the Suppression of Vice) was battling against drugs and other “special evils.” And in April of that year, the group’s leaders successfully petitioned the Massachusetts Legislature to outlaw possession of several “hypnotic drugs,” including cannabis.

One hundred five years, seven months, and 16 days later — Thursday — marijuana became legal again in Massachusetts.

Changing marijuana laws aren’t necessarily making weed more welcome in the workplace. For now, many employers appear to be sticking with their drug testing and personal conduct policies, even in states where recreational marijuana use is now permitted.

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration has introduced a new rule on how it tracks marijuana extracts that is causing concern in the marijuana industry. But should it?

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

Yesterday sparks flew as word was out that the DEA would be making some important announcements relating to the treatment of marijuana as a Schedule 1 substance under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).

Today, the excitement died down as the DEA issued a 180-page denial (inclusive of attachments; the actual denial is only three pages long) of a petition to initiate rulemaking proceedings to reschedule marijuana, filed by a Mr. Bryan Krumm in December 2009.

Mr. Krumm’s petition requested that marijuana be removed from Schedule I of the CSA claiming that: 1) marijuana has accepted medical use in the U.S.; 2) studies have shown that smoked marijuana has proven safe and effective; 3) marijuana is safe for use under medical supervision; and 4) marijuana does not have the abuse potential for placement in Schedule I.

After gathering all necessary data, DEA involved the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which then conducted its own scientific and medical evaluation into Mr. Krumm’s assertions. HHS concluded that marijuana does have a potential for abuse, does not have an accepted medical use in this country, and does not have an acceptable level of safety for use even under the care of a medical professional.  For now, marijuana remains a Schedule I drug under the CSA, and therefore is still illegal under federal law.