Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Welcome also to a new year of Week in Weed; after the many cannabis-related events of 2018, one can only imagine what will be occupying our attention in 2019…

This week, saw the release of a disappointing report on the possibility of cannabis banks in California.  Not feasible, as they would face insurmountable hurdles.  Read the full report for yourself here.

Meanwhile, in Florida, the procedure for licensing medical marijuana businesses has come under question.  In addition to the constitutional issues, the dispute between the Department of Health and a circuit court judge centers around how many licenses can be issued and whether vertical integration should be required.  Stay tuned for more on this issue, as the case has been appealed.

And in Massachusetts, a state Senator has plans to introduce legislation that would prevent employers from firing workers for off-duty cannabis use.  We’ll be keeping our eyes on this as well.

After Michigan legalized marijuana, we speculated that Illinois or Wisconsin might be next.  A state that seems unlikely to follow their neighbor’s lead is Indiana, where the governor is not a fan.

One big state that hasn’t made a move on cannabis is Texas.  Could that change in the new year?  Only time will tell.

In international news, St. Vincent and the Grenadines has decriminalized marijuana.  And what about Ireland?  They’ve made noises about legalizing medical marijuana before; could 2019 be the year?

We’ve got a lot to look forward to in 2019 – see you next Friday!

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

We’re about six weeks away from the legalization of marijuana in Canada, but Canadian marijuana stocks are already on the New York Stock Exchange.

Canopy Growth late Wednesday said it expects to begin trading on the NYSE tomorrow, making it one of two Canadian pure-play marijuana stocks to list on a major U.S. exchange.

The only pureplay marijuana stock with any shot at being added to the S&P 500 anytime soon is Canadian-based Canopy Growth Corp.

In Florida, a circuit court judge has ruled a medical marijuana smoking ban unconstitutional.

A Florida judge has ruled the state’s ban on smoking medical cannabis unconstitutional, calling the Legislature-approved ban “invalid and unenforceable.”

In a move that could potentially provide an even bigger boost to growers and retailers in one of the country’s fastest-growing markets, a Florida judge ruled the state’s ban on smokable medical marijuana is unconstitutional.

Cannabis is apparently not immune from the laws of supply and demand, as proven by the situation in Oregon.

When Oregon lawmakers created the state’s legal marijuana program, they had one goal in mind above all else: to convince illicit pot growers to leave the black market.

State regulators say Oregon produced enough recreational cannabis last year to supply every adult resident with more than 5 ounces (140 grams) of legal marijuana.

And finally, birthday greetings to Tommy Chong, who, believe it or not, recently turned 80.

Yeah man, Tommy Chong says he always knew he’d live to see the day marijuana legalization would be sweeping the country.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Pot smokers in California are counting down to the New Year’s “toke of midnight.” On Jan. 1, the nation’s most populous state will become the eighth (along with Washington, D.C.) to have legalized recreational marijuana.

It was a lung-busting 2017 for the North American cannabis industry, with marijuana executives stateside holding their collective breath wondering whether the new Trump administration would crack down on legal MJ businesses.

First Green Bank, a community bank that was handling accounts for six of the state’s seven licensed producers of medical marijuana announced it is closing the accounts of its cannabis clients.

This announcement may have huge implications for the cannabis industry.

That’s our last report for 2017 – we wish everyone a Happy New Year!

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Nevada state legislators put the final touches on measures to regulate marijuana this week, just weeks before Nevada becomes the fifth state to legalize the use and sale of marijuana for recreational purposes.

Florida lawmakers reached a compromise on key details regarding the number of dispensaries and plans for additional licenses under the state’s full-fledged medical marijuana, paving the way for legislators to add MMJ legislation to this week’s special legislative session.

Legalizing marijuana helps all marijuana stocks, right?

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at the world of legalized marijuana.

Vermont lawmakers have approved a modest expansion to the state’s medical marijuana program, permitting dispensaries to open more locations and expanding the list of medical conditions treatable with MMJ.

Walt Disney World has prohibited any marijuana on its grounds, including medical marijuana, which is legal in Florida.

Pot advocates are calling on U.S. lawmakers to legalize the substance federally as support reaches an all-time high.

Anything we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

Tuesday turned out to be a big night for medical marijuana supporters in Florida – with voters overwhelmingly casting their votes in favor of a full-scale medical marijuana program. Florida’s Amendment 2 has the potential to be one of the most permissive medical marijuana rules in the country. Amendment 2 provides that patients with illnesses such as cancer, HIV, post-traumatic stress disorder, Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy would be eligible to access medical marijuana. In addition to the prescribed illness, the measure also allows doctors to recommend medical marijuana for “other debilitating medical conditions of the same kind or class as or comparable to those enumerated, and for which a physician believes that the medical use of marijuana would likely outweigh the potential health risks for a patient.” While the measure requires that the illness be severe – the wording seems to give physicians a lot of leeway in determining which conditions meet the “severe” criteria.

Although the law is set to go into effect in January of 2017, Florida lawmakers must still draft laws regarding how the law will be implemented and regulated, which is set to begin in March 2017. Further, patients themselves must have a 90-day relationship with physicians licensed by the state before obtaining the cannabis.

The Florida chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) filed a civil lawsuit against the Broward County Commissioner of Elections, after news reports indicated that some mail-in ballots did not include a question about a state constitutional amendment on allowing medical marijuana.

The plaintiffs’ are seeking “a judicial declaration enjoining the Defendants from distributing any further ballots, and implementing an emergency plan to issue new ones which insure the inclusion of the proposed constitutional amendment on the ballot,” the organization said in a statement.

The claim was filed by NORML’s national vice chairman, Fort Lauderdale attorney Norm Kent, and his law partner, Russell Cormican, on behalf of Florida NORML and Karen Goldstein, NORML Florida’s chair, a West Park, Broward County voter.

Florida’s Amendment 2 would legalize medical marijuana for treating individuals with specific debilitating diseases or comparable debilitating conditions as determined by a licensed state physician.  Limited medical marijuana use is currently permitted under the state’s 2014 Compassionate Medical Cannabis Act; however, the 2016 amendment fully legalizes medical marijuana use and expands protection to a larger category of diseases and conditions.

Politico reported that recent polls show that more than 70 percent of likely Florida voters support the medical marijuana amendment.

 

 

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

 

The Drug Enforcement Agency will announce Thursday that marijuana will remain a schedule 1 drug, which declares it has “no medical use or purpose,” according to a U.S. official familiar with the decision.  Note: see our post on this topic here: Are We There Yet? The Wait Between Legalization and Availability of Medical Marijuana.

 

One of the biggest financial institutions in the Tampa Bay area has extended a $100,000 line of credit to a company that hopes to capitalize on Florida’s upcoming medical marijuana industry.

 

Plot twist: Two grower applicants initially placed in the top 15 were bumped to spots 16 and 17, because the top 15 did not include the geographic representation noted in the law.

 

And if you think Mr. Trump and Secretary Clinton are your only two options in November, think again:

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Chief Wana Dubie’s dream of representing Missouri in the U.S. Senate has gone up in smoke.

As we know, many states have now legalized the sale and use of marijuana for medical purposes.  Often, advocates of medical marijuana have worked for many years in order to see their state’s voters or legislature make access to cannabis the law of the land.  This doesn’t mean that patients will be able to purchase marijuana any time soon, however.  The wait can be years.

Continue Reading Are We There Yet? The Wait Between Legalization and Availability of Medical Marijuana