Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Let’s start off this week’s post with some international news.  The World Health Organization is recommending that cannabis should be removed as a controlled substance under international treaties.  The recommendations will come up for a vote in March of this year.

Banking for the cannabis industry is a subject we watch closely.  In California, it’s been revealed that a credit union has surreptitiously (until now) been providing financial services to several marijuana businesses for the past year.

Turning our attention to the Midwest, which does seem to be the latest hotbed of cannabis activity, we find that Ohio medical marijuana sales have been very strong.  Illinois is now allowing those prescribed opioids to obtain temporary certification for medical cannabis.  Yet another indication that full legalization is in the cards?

Following up on our Tennessee coverage, the legislature is now considering validating out-of-state medical marijuana cards for use in the Volunteer State.  And Arkansas has now licensed 32 medical cannabis dispensaries, with sales possible by April.

New York looked as if it was on the verge of full legalization, but that may have changed.  Governor Cuomo’s budget does not include any additional money for law enforcement dealing with a new set of circumstances after legalization.  We’ll keep our eye on this situation, obviously.

And finally, if you had to pick a stock ticker symbol for a cannabis company, could you do any better than POT?

 

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Although most people following AG Nominee William Barr’s hearing before the Senate Judiciary committee may have been listening for his views on the Mueller investigation, those of us with an interest in marijuana were wondering how he feels about legalized cannabis.  In an apparent break from his predecessor, Jeff Sessions, Barr said he would not go after cannabis companies.

In other federal news, Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D. – Oregon) has introduced a new bill (H.R. 420, of course) that would legalize marijuana nationwide.

And in yet another sign that marijuana is becoming more mainstream, the Cannabis Trade Federation has hired 15 lobbyists to argue for major new cannabis legislation.  Because you’re not really a legit industry until you have lobbyists.

The governor of New York has a plan for marijuana legalization.  No new legislation has yet been introduced.  Rhode Island, meanwhile, perhaps feeling surrounded by its larger neighbors and their embrace of cannabis, is looking, albeit reluctantly, at legalization as well.

In Midwestern marijuana news, dispensaries have opened in Ohio, the new governor of Wisconsin has announced plans to begin legalizing medical cannabis, and a group in Minnesota is pushing for marijuana legalization there.  The slogan “Fix pot holes with pot taxes” may resonate in an area with long winters.

Finally, a beer company in South Africa is looking to capitalize on the recent legalization of marijuana in that country.  Poison City Brewing is pushing its latest Durban Poison cannabis beer into the market.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Once marijuana is legal in a state, the process for providing it is just beginning.  And that process can be fraught with difficulty, as the state of Ohio is finding out.

Ohio’s auditor said the state’s process for selecting medical marijuana grower applicants suffered from numerous errors and inconsistencies.

Meanwhile, the federal government is moving closer to approving more licenses to grow marijuana for research.  But there’s drama here too: a provision that those with prior drug convictions need not apply.

A powerful U.S. House panel that oversees federal drug enforcement efforts approved a bill on Thursday to require the Department of Justice and Attorney General Jeff Sessions to begin issuing more licenses to grow marijuana for research.

This greater interest in marijuana research will be of no help to Canadian cannabis workers, who are facing a lifetime ban at the border.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Tuesday that he will not “impress upon the U.S. who they have to let in or not.”

And finally, we couldn’t help but include this story that combines Maine lobster and marijuana.

Lobsters in one Maine restaurant go out in a blaze of glory once they hit the pot. The owner of a lobster joint is sedating her crustaceans with marijuana smoke before cooking them — which she says gives them a blissfully humane death.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

Ohio’s medical marijuana market was set to open in September, but there’s been a delay.

Ohio had set a Sept. 8 deadline to have a fully operational medical marijuana market. But the state confirmed this week what industry observers have predicted for a while: It’s not going to happen.

In fact, it could take weeks more before medicinal weed is available for patients. Even then, it’s likely to be available only in limited quantities.

More politicians express support for marijuana; the latest legislation seeks to prevent the federal government from interfering in states where it is legal.

The Senators’ Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States Act isn’t a legalization bill, but it would let states chart their own course on cannabis without fear of federal interference.

President Donald Trump said Friday that he was inclined to support a bipartisan effort in Congress to ease the U.S. ban on marijuana, a proposal that would dramatically reshape the nation’s legal landscape for pot users and businesses.

Industrial hemp may be on its way to full legalization.

The farm bill includes hemp legalization legislation that is backed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.  McConnell made a case during Wednesday’s agriculture panel meeting for supporting the hemp legalization.

Welcome back to The Weed in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

In what’s become a regular feature, we have more politicians who are coming out in favor of legalized marijuana, or at least, backing away from their previous opposition.

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), a potential 2020 White House contender, is joining Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), who is also speculated to be a possible presidential candidate, in the fight to legalize marijuana under federal law.

After years of halting steps, top prosecutors and elected officials in New York City on Tuesday made a sudden dash toward ending many of the marijuana arrests that for decades have entangled mostly black and Hispanic people.

More states are putting marijuana on the ballot.  Ohio is making a move in that direction.

A proposed constitutional amendment to legalize adult-use marijuana in Ohio has cleared an initial hurdle after winning approval from the state’s top attorney.

A proposed constitutional amendment to legalize recreational marijuana in Ohio completed the first step Thursday in qualifying the measure for a statewide ballot.

So what do you do when marijuana prices tumble?  Start growing hemp.

SPRINGFIELD, Ore. (AP) — A glut of legal marijuana has driven Oregon pot prices to rock-bottom levels, prompting some nervous growers to start pivoting to another type of cannabis to make ends meet — one that doesn’t come with a high.

 

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Wednesday criticized the legalization of marijuana in multiple states and warned that the federal law banning use and sale of the drug “remains in effect,” remarks that could stoke fears of a federal crackdown.

Ohio regulators will soon be taking applications for the 60 medical marijuana dispensary licenses up for grabs in the state. Prospective dispensary owners will have a two-week window – Nov. 3-Nov. 17 – to submit their applications.

Las Vegas officials have decided to wait until Denver approves the nation’s first marijuana club before they further discuss licensing lounges in Sin City.

And if you’re thinking that marijuana might be the next item available via drone delivery, think again.

Internet distribution sites like Amazon are on the verge of delivering products – including food and beer – via drone. However, marijuana isn’t soon to be on the short list, at least not in California.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

It took Ohio years to legalize the production and sale of marijuana for medical purposes. Now that the legislation is finally in place, numerous organizations and individuals are hoping to procure one of the highly coveted licenses that the state requires to cultivate, process or dispense marijuana.

The Colorado Legislature has approved a bill that would add post-traumatic stress disorder to its list of medical ailments that qualify patients for medical marijuana, a move that could provide a shot in the arm to the state’s MMJ industry.

It is certainly a sign of the times that a partnership of major California media—led by Bay Area News Group, owner of the San Jose Mercury News—has launched a website entitled The Canniforniandedicated to reporting on the fast-growing cannabis sector in post-legalization California.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

 

Ohio’s Supreme Court affirmed that lawyers in the state will be allowed to serve medical cannabis business clients, much to the relief of hopeful cannabis entrepreneurs.

 

Until he was released from the Baltimore Ravens this year, Eugene Monroe was the NFL’s foremost advocate for allowing players to use medical marijuana. Now he’s a partner in a company suing Maryland regulators for rejecting its application to grow the drug.

 

Gov. Rick Snyder has signed into law new marijuana regulations that he says clarify Michigan’s 8-year-old voter-approved initiative that legalized the drug for medical use.

 

A proposal to allow medical marijuana in Missouri won’t go to voters this year because of an insufficient number of valid signatures, a judge has ruled.

 

Anything we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

 

Ohio’s Supreme Court Wednesday proposed rewriting its ethics rules to allow lawyers to help medical marijuana companies, a change that would be welcomed by local attorneys and cannabis entrepreneurs, according to the Columbus Dispatch.

 

Moving to address complaints about the program, the state’s Health Department is making substantial changes aimed at easing access to the drug.

 

A voter initiative legalizing recreational marijuana will be on the November ballot after the Arizona Supreme Court on Wednesday rejected a final legal challenge to the measure.

 

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Tell us in the comments.