Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legalized marijuana.

You would have been hard pressed, just a few years ago, to find investments outside of family-office groups. Then Washington and Colorado legalized.

 

In a move that may encourage Pennsylvania doctors to get certified to recommend medical marijuana, the state’s Department of Health has established a physician working group to help implement its new MMJ law.

 

About half of registered Massachusetts voters oppose a ballot proposal to legalize marijuana for people 21 years of age and older, according to a new poll.

 

And finally, because we’d be “Crazy” not to include this link:

Willie Nelson’s much-hyped marijuana brand Willie’s Reserve will debut in Washington state pot shops this month and in Colorado marijuana stores in August, Nelson’s team told The Cannabist exclusively.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at what’s happening in the world of legal marijuana.

It’s not just for Microsoft anymore!  Is global technology giant Google the latest major U.S. corporation to kick the tires of the marijuana industry? It could be. Signs suggest the Mountain View, California-based company is exploring the opportunity to work with cannabis businesses.

Under proposal, bars and other businesses could create “consumption areas” — but only with neighborhood backing.

The state’s highest court has cleared the way for a question that calls for legalizing recreational marijuana in Massachusetts to appear on the November ballot.

And one more item, just for grins:

The Jamaican government is considering installing kiosks at airport arrival halls and seaports for tourists to get a license to buy and consume up to two ounces of marijuana during their stay on the island.

Anything we missed?  Let us know in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at the world of legalized marijuana.

Nebraska and Oklahoma may not have had their day in (Supreme) Court, but they are undeterred in their fight against Colorado’s legalization of recreational marijuana.

A judge in Illinois’ Cook County ordered the state’s medical marijuana program to add post-traumatic stress disorder to the list of qualifying conditions for MMJ within 30 days.

An initiative has officially obtained enough signatures to be placed on November’s ballot. It would allow adults to possess up to an ounce of marijuana and grow up to six plants for recreational use.

Authorities say they have arrested a man on suspicion of driving while high on pot after he crashed into a Happy Valley marijuana dispensary.

That last item was more for fun than real news value, but it’s Friday, it’s a long weekend, and how could we resist?

Anything we missed?  Let us know in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at the world of legalized marijuana.

Microsoft is welcoming marijuana compliance company Kind Financial onto its Azure Government cloud platform, marking a legitimizing first for the legal cannabis business while positioning the technology giant at the vanguard of a potentially lucrative new industry.

Colorado and Washington may have jumped ahead in the race to become North America’s marijuana kings, but Canada is now positioned to take a lead in the booming multibillion-dollar industry.

Denver voters may consider a ballot measure this fall to make the city the most populous place in the nation to expressly allow pot clubs.

Although Sean Parker’s controversial marijuana ballot measure is considered by some to be the great green hope in terms of bringing prohibition to an end in California later this year, many advocates for the initiative, including Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom, are concerned that the cavalier attitude among the public could sabotage legalization efforts for many years to come.

Something we missed that everyone needs to know?  Give us a shout in the comments.

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your Friday look at news in the world of legalized marijuana.

Various outlets have been reporting on the study done by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety on the increase in fatal car accidents involving drivers who have used marijuana.  The study shows that the number of such cases has doubled since Washington legalized recreational use of cannabis.  This article gives a summary of the report, as well as links to other useful resources.

The prospect of legal medical marijuana in Florida has the industry excited about serving what could become the nation’s second largest market for cannabis. Floridians will have the opportunity to vote up or down on Amendment 2, which would expand medical marijuana for many more patients than have access to the drug under current law.

The messenger business is about to get a little easier for those delivering marijuana in Colorado.  The “marijuana transporter” license would, among other things, allow couriers to store cannabis temporarily if circumstances like bad weather prevented them from completing a delivery.

Anything we missed?  Let us know in the comments section.

Two years after Colorado amended its constitution to legalize and regulate the recreational use of marijuana, in December 2014, the states of Nebraska and Oklahoma filed a motion in  the U.S. Supreme Court for leave to file a complaint against the state of Colorado, ultimately seeking to invalidate portions of Colorado’s constitutional amendment concerning marijuana and to enjoin its implementation.

Upon request by the Supreme Court, the United States submitted an amicus brief in support of its views on the enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act (“CSA”) in states wherein the sale and distribution of marijuana has been de-criminalized.  After citing to memoranda from 2009 and 2013—in which the Department of Justice provided instructions in reviewing the prosecution of CSA violations related to marijuana use in these states—the DOJ expressed the view that the Plaintiff states’ motion should be denied.  The United States proposed denial of the motion because the case was not “appropriate… for the exercise of [the Supreme Court’s] original jurisdiction” and “[e]ntertaining the type of dispute at issue here—essentially that one State’s laws make it more likely that third parties will violate federal and state law in another State—would represent a substantial and unwarranted expansion of [the Supreme Court’s] original jurisdiction.”

The United States continued by citing Supreme Court precedent related to the Court’s original jurisdiction in disputes between or among states.  “The model case for invocation [of such] is a dispute between States of such seriousness that it would amount to casus belli if the States were fully sovereign” (emphasis added).  The United States rejected the idea that the case at bar fell into the above category, and provided examples where original jurisdiction was found (e.g., claims that an agent of the defendant state was engaging in environmental harms against plaintiff state).  Further, the United States argued that original jurisdiction is proper only where one state’s actions amounted to the direct cause of harm to another state.  Essentially, the United States argued that the Supreme Court should hear cases only where one state’s actions were the direct cause of another state’s harm.  The Plaintiff states’ contention that the de-criminalization of the sale and distribution of marijuana in Colorado would increase the amount of third-party crime in their states simply did not meet the referenced standards as Colorado did not direct or authorize such action, the United States argued.

Moreover, the United States appeared unpersuaded by the Plaintiff states’ assertion that the Supreme Court was the only venue in which they could sue Colorado.  However, the United States pointed out that the states could engage in suit at the district court level, and noted that two suits raising the issues at bar were pending in the District of Colorado courts.  Continue Reading Marijuana Controversy Not a High Priority for Supreme Court

Welcome back to The Week in Weed, your every Friday look at news from the world of legalized cannabis.  The biggest news is that the Supreme Court decided not to hear a case brought by the states of Nebraska and Oklahoma against the state of Colorado, concerning Colorado’s legalization of marijuana.  There are any number of articles on this topic, but the one to which we’ve linked, from The Washington Post, focuses on how this decision will affect legalization efforts generally.

In addition, the state of Washington has promulgated new rules governing the recall of marijuana products, and as states legalize the use of marijuana to treat post-traumatic stress disorder, many veterans are already using the drug, regardless of its legality or its proven effectiveness.

 

Washington State marijuana businesses are now subject to new rules under which various products can be recalled and even destroyed due to pesticide use.

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — A growing number of states are weighing whether to legalize marijuana to treat post-traumatic stress disorder. But for many veterans, the debate is already over.

Marijuana legalization opponents are facing an increasingly uphill battle.

 

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